Meet Me in 5: Developing a Global Perspective

Our ongoing “Meet Me in 5” series covers 5 people, topics or questions to illustrate how Covance nurtures exceptional people, provides an energizing purpose and enables extraordinary potential in its employees’ careers.

In this article, Brian Maron, executive director, global operations, immunology & immunotoxicology, discusses culture and his global career journey with Covance.

Covance Careers

1. A global journey

Brian Maron has a deep history with Covance, a journey that has taken him to many places around the world. Starting out in cardiac safety for clinical trials as a software developer in the mid-90s, he worked his way up to supervise a team of software developers and was then asked if he’d like to relocate from Wisconsin to Nevada to lead the IT department. “For someone who had never lived outside of Wisconsin, this was a big move, but my wife and I decided it was a great opportunity for us,” says Brian.

It turned out Nevada was just the beginning of Brian’s global career journey with Covance. Brian was then given the chance to expand cardiac safety in the United Kingdom and was later presented the opportunity to move to Shanghai, China to set up a new facility to expand the Covance global footprint. Coming full circle, Brian now resides back in Wisconsin and enjoys nurturing talent and encouraging his team to take on assignments that allow them to see the world and grow our business.

2. A proud accomplishment

In Shanghai, Brian was tasked to develop solutions for toxicology, lead optimization toxicology, metabolism and in vivo PK screening services. The team had a goal to achieve good laboratory practices (GLP) certification of the new facility – something no other foreign company had achieved in China at the time.

“It was a learning experience,” says Brian, “but also very satisfying. From a technical perspective, we had to learn the local regulations, which are different from the US. and Europe, and build local relationships. I learned a lot about international business culture and how to leverage the phenomenal leadership and experience of our colleagues in China.”

3. Responding to rapid growth

Now responsible for expanding immunology and immunotoxicology solutions, Brian notes the exciting culture. “Even though Covance has been in this area for a while, this fast-growth environment feels like a start-up. Our team is extremely energized, so more than ever, I believe it’s important to help mentor our new leaders and those driven to succeed at Covance. I am highly focused on the short- and long-term needs of our clients and our employees.”

 4. Exploring unique career tracks

For Brian, his career advances at Covance were about seeking out new opportunities. “If you are willing to explore unique career tracks, Covance will be there as your partner,” explains Brian. “You can play a major role in some really interesting global initiatives and have confidence you will succeed with the support of exception people. That’s why I really enjoy working for a larger company like Covance. There are many opportunities to advance drug development – and your career.”

5. Making a positive impact

In his day-to-day work, Brian interacts with people from around the world. He says, “It’s inspiring to be a piece of something large and impactful, and even more exciting to see what our team can achieve together.”

When thinking about his next career move, Brian jokes, “I’ve definitely given up on predicting the future.” But one constant remains in his daily work. “I continue to believe in the underlying mission of Covance to help produce medicines which improve global health. The things I do with my team have an impact on my own life and the lives of my family and friends – work that makes us all proud.”

To learn more about life at Covance and explore careers, visit www.Careers.Covance.com.

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Exploring the Epidemiology of Diabetic Heart Failure

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