New REACH Nanomaterial Requirements: What You Need to Do

The New EU Nanotechnology Regulation

On December 3, 2018, the European Commission (EC) adopted Regulation 2018/1881, amending the existing , amending the existing Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulation, to directly address nanoparticles. The nanotechnology regulation applies to any substance that might be, or might contain, a nanomaterial (e.g., powder), whether or not it has been manufactured as a nanotechnology. Crucially the revised nanoparticle regulation applies to both new and registered substances and all dossiers will need to be updated with the necessary data.

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What the New EU Endocrine Disruptor Assessment Means for Renewal of Your Active Ingredients

Introduction

The new EU requirements for endocrine disruptor identification will impact any active ingredient (AI) renewals with expected decisions from November 2018 onwards. Learn more about these requirements and key strategies to meet them, below[CS1] [CS2].

The European Commission has adopted new criteria for identifying endocrine disruptors (EDs) – these criteria apply to new active ingredients (AIs) and those going through renewal (). So, if the AIs in your plant protection products (PPPs) are due for renewal you need to understand the new requirements and how you can meet them.

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What You Need to Know About Neonicotinoids and The EU

Photo of a bee

Introduction

Neonicotinoids were developed to find safer, more effective alternatives to chlorinated hydrocarbons, organophosphates, carbamates, and pyrethroids, so, ironically, some neonicotinoids are now banned in the EU because of their toxicity to bees and other pollinators, as well as to a wider group of species.

The agricultural and environmental consequences of neonicotinoid use and the recent EU regulatory restriction have made neonicotinoids one of the most controversial areas of science and policy.

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Understanding Annexes VII-X

Avoiding obstacles with REACH Annexes VII-X

Posted by Dr. David Howes, Expert Consultant in Chemical Legislation and Chemistry, Covance

In the EU, the Registration, Evaluation, Authorization and Restriction of Chemicals (REACH) regulations address the manufacturing and import of chemicals to ensure they are safe for human health and the environment. The registration dossier outlines the standard information requirements for a substance and minimum data required that describe the physicochemical, toxicological, environmental fate and ecotoxicological properties of the substance.

With this information, the European Chemicals Agency (ECHA) can make a decision regarding the safety of the substance. However, data requirements vary with the amount of substance used. Often, more complex information is required to manufacture or import a substance into the EU and the European Economic Area (EEA).

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Preserving Lifecycles: Renewing Established Pesticides

The regulation that governs the marketing, sale, and use of pesticides is just a fact of life, but the standards imposed are constantly evolving as our scientific insight and knowledge increases. This series of informational blogs is designed to examine how existing active substances (ASs) are managed through the current regulatory renewal systems in the EU and USA.

We have been using chemicals to protect plants from pests and diseases since 2,500 BC, when, as records show, ancient Sumerians used sulfur to control mites/insects. However, it was really towards the end of the 19th century that the industrial usage of inorganic products and those derived naturally, such as pyrethrum, became common and widespread.

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Future-Proofing Residue Analysis Services

As the regulatory landscape across the globe is rapidly evolving, more sophisticated requirements must be met by registrants and scientists. In parallel, scientific advances have impacted previous methodologies that were once seen as cutting edge but now may fail to adequately address new regulatory challenges.

Clients should consider techniques to future-proof their studies to flexibly adapt to pre- and post-registration regulatory and scientific environments and keep up with trends in the crop protection market.

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